CA Employment Law Blog


California’s legal climate presents unique challenges to businesses operating in the state. A frequent author and speaker on employment law, Jeff is a regular contributor to the firm’s California Employment Law blog, providing insight into the full spectrum of California labor laws concerning class actions, wage and hour issues, overtime matters, discrimination and harassment claims, privacy concerns, accommodations and other issues.

Scroll down to see Jeff's most recent blog posts.

Recent Blog Posts

  • Employer’s Guide to Doing Business In California – Newly Updated We recently updated a 15-page Employer’s Guide to Doing Business In California. The guide provides clear summaries of California’s unique requirements for meal and rest periods, the Fair Pay Act, paychecks and wage statements, the various leaves of absence, and more. If you subscribe to that whole “ounce of prevention” theory, this is a great way to see if your company is complying with California’s unique employment law requirements. You can download a pdf of the Guide here. Spending a little time to determine if your... More
  • Invitation: Join Us in San Francisco on January 27 for a 2017 Employment Law Update I hope you’ll join my Fox colleagues Keith Chrestionson and Jaemin Chang and me on January 27 for the next in our series of breakfast briefings in our San Francisco office.  Our breakfast series explores various topics of interest to the Bay Area’s business communities in informal presentations and interactive Q&A sessions.  This session will focus on new California laws and local ordinances that are most likely to affect employers throughout the state, including: Legalization of marijuana and its effect on... More
  • What Does It Mean That CA Employers Must “Relinquish All Control” During Breaks? Let’s pick up where we left off. In our last post of 2016, I was complaining about the California Supreme Court’s decision in Augustus v. ABM Security Services, Inc. The majority opinion in that case said that employees who were required to carry phones or pagers on their rest breaks, even if they didn’t get called or paged, were deprived of their statutory breaks and were therefore owed a one-hour penalty. While I found plenty to complain about in that decision... More
  • CA Employees Required to Carry Radios or Pagers on Rest Breaks Are Owed a Penalty The worst aspect of California employment law is the way it combines unclear requirements with exorbitant penalties for noncompliance. So employers can’t necessarily tell what the law requires and, if they get it wrong, face crippling financial penalties. The latest illustration of that principle comes from the California Supreme Court’s December 22, 2016 opinion in Augustus v. ABM Security Services, Inc. The plaintiffs in this consolidated class action worked as security guards and were required to keep their pagers and radio... More
  • 5 Things LA Employers Must Do Now To Comply With New “Ban the Box” Ordinance If you’re a city contractor or private employer in the City of Los Angeles with 10 or more employees, starting January 22, 2017 you will be subject to new restrictions on how you deal with job applicants’ criminal histories. The only employers exempt from these requirements will be those that are required by law to obtain conviction information, are prohibited by law from hiring applicants convicted of a crime, are seeking to fill positions that applicants with convictions are prohibited... More