The Federal Government Contracts & Procurement Blog

https://governmentcontracts.foxrothschild.com/

To help clients avoid risks and perform successfully in the hyper-competitive environment of government contracting, The Federal Government Contracts & Procurement Blog addresses current and future issues affecting federal contractors and procurement professionals in both the Washington, D.C., area and throughout the United States. It provides insight on the complex web of rules and regulations that govern the procurement process.

Recent Blog Posts

  • New Round of Audit Notifications Sent to Federal Contractors For federal contractors, affirmative action plan (AAP) audits may be just around the corner. The U.S. Department of Labor Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs sent 750 courtesy scheduling announcement letters (CSAL’s) last week to federal contractors, notifying them that their affirmative action plans (AAP) may be audited. This latest round of notifications, which supplements the 1,000 CSAL’s sent out earlier this year, alerts federal contractors that the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) will be sending scheduling letters in 45 days. The... More
  • Establishing Prejudice in an LPTA Protest   As I’ve covered here before, low-priced, technically acceptable procurements (LPTA) shine a light on a contractor’s ability to provide the required services at the lowest possible cost to the government.  Leave your style points at home.  It is all about getting lean to win the award. But when the evaluation is that simple, is there any room to challenge an LPTA award decision?  The answer is Yes — and a recent GAO protest offers some important insights into best practices. The protest... More
  • GAO Offers Insight on Competitive Range Decisions & Protests Federal procurements often include a competitive range of offerors seeking the contract award.  The Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) competitive range procedure offers the agency an incremental stage in the competition where it can pare down a large pool of offerors into a narrow group consisting of only those proposals with a reasonable chance of receiving the award. But what qualifications are used to determine the offerors included in the competitive range?  And can you protest your firm’s improper exclusion from a... More
  • Update: Federal Government Shutdowns and Contractor Risk Here we go again.  Back in March, I discussed the impact of the brief government shutdowns in January and February and risks associated with what could have been (had the stand-off gone on much longer). Today, news from the White House and Capitol Hill raises concerns over another possible shutdown in September (when the government will run out of money without action by Congress and the President). In light of this uncertainty, I thought it made sense to again share practical steps that... More
  • Fox Speaks: Risk Management in Government Contracting I recently had the opportunity to present an online CLE for LawLine on Risk Management in Government Contracting. This is my second time presenting a course for LawLine (I previously taught a course on Small Business Compliance). Risk Management is a broad topic that can mean different things to different people. In this course, I decided to focus on practical steps that contractors can take to develop a corporate Culture of Compliance. There is little value in limiting compliance training to only the... More
  • GAO Protest Update: Understanding “Meaningful Discussions” in Contract Competitions In today’s Federal marketplace, it is very common to see solicitations that give the Agency the option of entering into discussions with offerors.  The primary objective of discussions is to maximize competition and, in turn, the Agency’s ability to obtain the best possible value. Once it makes the decision to enter into discussions, the Agency must do so in good faith and with all offerors remaining in the competition.  Further, the discussions themselves must be “meaningful” – a fairly subjective standard that (predictably)... More
  • When to Protest: Thoughts on Challenging a Defective Solicitation Two pieces of advice I often provide to government contractors are: 1.When responding to a solicitation, give the government precisely what it asks for – right down to the letter.  This includes providing the information in the correct section of your proposal.  The agency will not play hide-and-seek; and 2.  If you think there is something askew with a procurement or award decision – act fast.  There are lots of different deadlines enforced by GAO, but they all come and go very... More
  • Federal Contractors’ Guide to Small Business Administration Set-Aside Contracts, Size Standards, Size Protests, and Affiliation Please see the following link for Fox Rothschild LLP’s Federal Contractors’ Guide to Small Business Administration Set-Aside Contracts, Size Standards, Size Protests, and Affiliation.  http://www.foxrothschild.com/douglas-p-hibshman/publications/federal-contractors-guide-to-small-business-administration-set-aside-contracts-size-standards-size-protests-and-affiliation/ The federal government sets aside a significant portion of its procurement dollars each year for purchasing goods and services from small businesses.  Small business set-aside procurements and small business contract awards (“Set-Aside Procurements” and “Set-Aside Contracts,” respectively) provide substantial opportunities for a certified small business concern (SBC) to compete for and perform federal contract work. However, SBCs... More
  • Contractors Need Not Wait To Pursue Delay Claims Do contractors need to wait for a project to be complete to file a delay claim? The answer is a resounding NO! There is no reason for a contractor to finance a government-caused delay for any longer than absolutely necessary. The Civilian Board of Contract Appeals (CBCA) recently drove this point home in CTA I, LLC v. Department of Veterans Affairs, CBCA 5826 (2018). In that case, CTA filed an Appeal in August 2017 seeking approximately $2 million in delay, inefficiency,... More
  • Government Shutdowns: Practical Strategies for Mitigating Contractor Risk Here we go again.  Back in March, I discussed the impact of the brief government shutdown and risks associated with what could have been (had the stand-off gone on much longer). Today, news from the White House and Capitol Hill raised concerns over another possible shutdown in September (when the government will run out of money without action by Congress and the President). In light of this uncertainty, I thought it made sense to again share practical steps that contractors can take... More