Wage & Hour — Developments & Highlights


Mark contributes to the Wage & Hour — Developments & Highlights blog to provide the latest information and his observations on new developments in wage-hour law, such as class actions, exemption/misclassification and working time issues.

Recent Blog Posts

  • FLSA Proposed Class Cut By Judge Who Found Dissimilarities Among Workers Often, when a class of workers petitions for conditional certification in FLSA collective action, and such certification is granted, it usually is for the entire class being asked for.  Sometimes it is not and when that happens, it is “news.”  That has happened in a recent Pennsylvania case where the proposed class was more than two-hundred workers and the certified class was less than forty.  The case is entitled Hunt v. McKesson Corp., and was filed in federal court in... More
  • Will New USDOL Compliance Office Help or Hurt Employers?—Time Will Tell There is an old saying, “I’m from the government and I’m here to help you.” Everybody thinks that is funny as, often, the opposite is true, especially for the employer community. Well, the USDOL is putting a new spin on this maxim by creating an office to (supposedly) help employers in complying with the Fair Labor Standards Act. The new organ, denominated the Office of Compliance Initiatives, will coordinate with other enforcement agencies in an effort to improve compliance with the... More
  • CBS Parking Spot Case Settles: Another Example Of A FLSA Working Time Issue Gone Viral I had blogged about this case when it first came out. It struck me as very interesting because not only is the subject matter unique, it also raises the whole thorny issue of what is (or is not) working time. This latest case involves Parking Production Assistants (PPAs). These people worked for CBS and their function was to guard parking spaces. Now, the employer will settle this class action for $9.98 million to settle the case where the theory was... More
  • Defense Counsel Should Always Consider Preemption Motions To Dismiss In FLSA Cases When State Common Law Claims Are Asserted Where a plaintiff files a FLSA (or other statutory wage hour) lawsuit, he may well file state law, tort-like claims, such as unjust enrichment, breach of contract, fraud and others. Usually, if not always, those claims/counts are predicated upon and solely arise from the alleged FLSA violations. As such, the FLSA (or any other wage statute at issue, like the NJ Prevailing Wage Act) is the exclusive remedy for these alleged violations and the state law claims are preempted. Thus,... More
  • Interagency Coordination Between NJDOL And USDOL: Like Petula Clark Sang, Is This A “Sign Of The Times?” The issue of who is and who is not an independent contractor has exploded on the legal scene in recent years. Many agencies are honing in on this topic and I have, over the last five years, probably defended more than fifty audits, inspections and lawsuits involving this issue. Well, the landscape just got murkier, or more difficult for employers as the US Department of Labor and the NJ Department of Labor have just signed a cooperation agreement to target... More
  • Sales Representatives Get Certification On Failure To Include Commissions In Overtime Class Action: A Cautionary Tale It is vital for employers to remember that when non-exempt employees earn commissions, those commissions must be included in the computation of their regular rate when they work overtime. The inclusion of the commissions bumps up the regular rate a little but if this is not done, then these small amounts of money can quickly add up if an employee or, worse yet, a class of employees files a lawsuit. That is exactly what has happened in a recent case... More
  • USDOL Issues Guidance On Independent Contractor Issues In The Home Health Care Industry—The More Things Change… I am a big believer in advice from the U.S. Department of Labor. I have applauded the re-introduction of opinion letters and I welcome any published guidance (on any subject) so I can better advise/counsel my clients on compliance issues. The home health care industry has been aflutter recently with all kinds of litigation and DOL issuances. A thorny issue is when/if someone working in this field is an independent contractor. Well, the agency has recently published guidance on this... More
  • Another USDOL Car Wash Lawsuit Highlights The Issues In That Industry The car wash industry is one that is subject to many alleged wage-hour issues (some might say abuses). A recent case illustrates this maxim. A car wash has just settled a lawsuit with the USDOL for $4.2 million on wage hour claims. The theory was that the employer avoided paying proper minimum wage and overtime by compelling workers to clock out but yet remain on the premises until more cars came in for washes. The case is entitled Acosta v.... More
  • Happy Birthday FLSA: Eighty And (Maybe Not) Still Going Strong! The Fair Labor Standards Act is eighty years old this month and commentators strongly suggest that the law needs updating in many areas. My colleague Tammy McCutchen stated that a complaint-driven mechanism defense should be engrafted into the FLSA. She stated that “I think employers should get the opportunity to avoid [some liability] by having in place a system of compliance and taking appropriate action based on investigations, just like they have under Title VII and the ADA and the ADEA.” In... More
  • Yet Another Assistant Manager Collective Action: Will They Never End? I have often written about the scourge of Assistant Manager class actions. The employee category is particularly subject to this kind of lawsuit as these workers often perform some non-exempt work and it is unclear many times if they possess and exercise sufficient and proper supervisory authority. A recent case in New Jersey provides yet another example. A federal judge has just conditionally certified a class of Assistant Store Managers who work for Panera Bread. They allege that they were... More